Amazon’s Alexa for Business reportedly earned less than $300,000 in its first year as customers worry about privacy and struggle with functionality (AMZN)

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Amazon’s Alexa for Business reportedly earned less than $300,000 in its first year as customers worry about privacy and struggle with functionality (AMZN)

In 2016, Amazon Alexa, with its uncanny ability to understand human speech, was the toast of the tech world, with some media declaring that voice was the next big thing and Alexa had already won it.

Flash forward to 2019, where the world has begun to understand how the sausage was made; that Amazon by default keeps transcripts of what people say to Alexa; that the Echo is experimenting with more proactive ways of waking up and doing things for people. Today, the media’s attitude can be summed up more like: “Alexa, should we trust you?”

In the midst of all of this, Amazon did what so many tech companies smartly do.

In late 2017 it launched an Alexa service aimed at businesses, who spend collectively about $4 trillion a year on tech. That service is Alexa for Business, and it lets employees do things like book conference rooms, take recordings of meetings, or launch apps with voice control by using Alexa-enabled devices.

Still, business customers are notoriously, and necessarily, concerned about security. And Alexa for Business has reportedly struggled to gain much traction, sources told the The Information’s Priya Anand, with concerns ranging from privacy to functionality.

WeWork famously killed its Alexa for Business trial only two months into it, CNBC’s Eugene Kim reported in December, although WeWork didn’t say why is suspended the program. Anand reports that Joh

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